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Sleep Disorder/ Insomnia

A sleep disorder, or somnipathy, is a medical disorder of the sleep patterns of a person or animal. Some sleep disorders are serious enough to interfere with normal physical, mental, social and emotional functioning. Polysomnography and actigraphy are tests commonly ordered for some sleep disorders.

Disruptions in sleep can be caused by a variety of issues, from teeth grinding bruxism night terrors. When a person suffers from difficulty falling asleep and/or staying asleep with no obvious cause, it is referred to as insomnia

Sleep disorders are broadly classified into dyssomnias parasomnias circadian rhythm sleep disorders involving the timing of sleep, and other disorders including ones caused by medical or psychological conditions and sleeping sickness. Some common sleep disorders include sleep apnea(stops in breathing during sleep),narcolepsy and hypersomnia (excessive sleepiness at inappropriate times),cataplexy(sudden and transient loss of muscle tone while awake), and sleeping sickness (disruption of sleep cycle due to infection). Other disorders include sleepwalking night terrors bed wetting. Management of sleep disturbances that are secondary to mental, medical, or substance abuse disorders should focus on the underlying conditions.

Most of us have experienced trouble sleeping at one time or another. This is normal and usually temporary, due to stress or other outside factors. But if sleep problems are a regular occurrence and interfere with your daily life, you may be suffering from a sleep disorder. Sleep disorders cause more than just sleepiness. The lack of quality sleep can have a negative impact on your energy, emotional balance, and health. The good news? You don’t have to live with sleeping problems. Just call Dr. Ajay Nihalani , the famous psychiatrist and sleep disorder specialist in Delhi and get rid of your sleep disorder or insomnia.

Insomnia: The most common type of sleep disorder

Insomnia, the inability to get to sleep or sleep well at night, is an all-too common sleeping problem—in fact, its the most common sleep complaint. Insomnia can be caused by a wide variety of things including stress, jet lag, a health condition, the medications you take, or even the amount of coffee you drink. Insomnia can also be caused by other sleep disorders or mental health conditions such as anxiety and depression.

Common signs and symptoms of insomnia include:

  • Difficulty falling asleep at night or getting back to sleep after waking during the night
  • Waking up frequently during the night
  • Your sleep feels light, fragmented, or unrefreshing
  • You need to take something (sleeping pills, nightcap, supplements) in order to get to sleep
  • Sleepiness and low energy during the day

Whatever the cause of your insomnia, being mindful of your sleep habits and learning to relax will help you sleep better and feel better. The good news is that most cases ofinsomnia can be curedwith lifestyle changes you can make on your own—without relying on sleep specialists or turning to prescription or over-the-counter sleeping pills.

Circadian rhythm sleep disorders

We all have an internal biological clock that regulates our 24-hour sleep-wake cycle, also known as our circadian rhythms. Light is the primary cue that influences circadian rhythms. When the sun comes up in the morning, the brain tells the body that its time to wake up. At night, when there is less light, your brain triggers the release of melatonin, a hormone that makes you sleepy.

When your circadian rhythms are disrupted or thrown off, you may feel groggy, disoriented, and sleepy at inconvenient times. Circadian rhythms have been linked to a variety or sleeping problems and sleep disorders, including insomnia, jet lag, and shift work sleep difficulties. Abnormal circadian rhythms have also been implicated in depression, bipolar disorder, and seasonal affective disorder (the winter blues).

Shift work sleeping problems

Shift work sleep disorder occurs when your work schedule and your biological clock are out of sync. In our 24-hour society, many workers have to work night shifts, early morning shifts, or rotating shifts. These schedules force you to work when your body is telling you to go to sleep, and sleep when your body is signaling you to wake.

While some people adjust better than others to the demands of shift work, most shift workers get less quality sleep than their daytime counterparts. As a result of sleep deprivation, many shift workers struggle with sleepiness and mental lethargy on the job. This cuts into their productivity and puts them at risk of injury.

Delayed sleep phase disorder

Delayed sleep phase disorder is a condition where your 24-hour cycle of sleep and wakefulness;your biological clock ;is significantly delayed. As a result, you go to sleep and wake up much later than other people. For example, you may not get sleepy until 4 a.m., at which time you go to bed and sleep soundly until noon, or at least you would if your daytime responsibilities didnt interfere. Delayed sleep phase disorder makes it difficult for you to keep normal hours to make it to morning classes, get the kids to school on time, or keep a 9-to-5 job.